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What is a solar charge controller?

Why do I need one?

A charge controller, or charge regulator is similar to the voltage regulator in your car. It regulates the voltage and current coming from the solar panels going to the battery. Most "12 volt" panels put out about 16 to 20 volts, so if there is no regulation the batteries will be damaged from overcharging. Most batteries need around 14 to 14.5 volts to get fully charged.

Do I always need a charge controller?

Not always, but usually. Generally, there is no need for a charge controller with the small maintenance, or trickle charge panels, such as the 1 to 5 watt panels. A rough rule is that if the panel puts out about 2 watts or less for each 50 battery amp-hours, then you don't need one.

For example, a standard flooded golf car battery is around 210 amp-hours. So to keep up a series pair of them (12 volts) just for maintenance or storage, you would want a panel that is around 4.2 watts. The popular 5 watt panels are close enough, and will not need a controller. If you are maintaining AGM deep cycle batteries, such as the Concorde Sun Xtender then you can use a smaller 2 to 2 watt panel.

Why 12 Volt Panels are 17 Volts

The obvious question then comes up - "why aren't panels just made to put out 12 volts". The reason is that if you do that, the panels will provide power only when cool, under perfect conditions, and full sun. This is not something you can count on in most places. The panels need to provide some extra voltage so that when the sun is low in the sky, or you have heavy haze, cloud cover, or high temperatures*, you still get some output from the panel. A fully charged battery is around 12.7 volts at rest (around 13.6 under charge), so the panel has to put out at least that much under worst case conditions.

*Contrary to intuition, solar panels work best at cooler temperatures. Roughly, a panel rated at 100 watts at room temperature will be an 83 watt panel at 110 degrees.
This section covers the theory and operation of "Maximum Power Point Tracking" as used in solar electric charge controllers.

A MPPT, or maximum power point tracker is an electronic DC to DC converter that optimizes the match between the solar array (PV panels), and the battery bank or utility grid. To put it simply, they convert a higher voltage DC output from solar panels (and a few wind generators) down to the lower voltage needed to charge batteries.

(These are sometimes called "power point trackers" for short - not to be confused with PANEL trackers, which are a solar panel mount that follows, or tracks, the sun).

So what do you mean by "optimize"?

Solar cells are neat things. Unfortunately, they are not very smart. Neither are batteries - in fact batteries are downright stupid. Most PV panels are built to put out a nominal 12 volts. The catch is "nominal". In actual fact, almost all "12 volt" solar panels are designed to put out from 16 to 18 volts. The problem is that a nominal 12 volt battery is pretty close to an actual 12 volts - 10.5 to 12.7 volts, depending on state of charge. Under charge, most batteries want from around 13.2 to 14.4 volts to fully charge - quite a bit different than what most panels are designed to put out.

OK, so now we have this neat 130 watt solar panel. Catch #1 is that it is rated at 130 watts at a particular voltage and current. The Kyocera KC-130 is rated at 7.39 amps at 17.6 volts. (7.39 amps times 17.6 volts = 130 watts).

Now the Catch 22

Why 130 Watts does NOT equal 130 watts

Where did my Watts go?

So what happens when you hook up this 130 watt panel to your battery through a regular charge controller?

Unfortunately, what happens is not 130 watts.

Your panel puts out 7.4 amps. Your battery is setting at 12 volts under charge: 7.4 amps times 12 volts = 88.8 watts. You lost over 41 watts - but you paid for 130. That 41 watts is not going anywhere, it just is not being produced because there is a poor match between the panel and the battery. With a very low battery, say 10.5 volts, it's even worse - you could be losing as much as 35% (11 volts x 7.4 amps = 81.4 watts. You lost about 48 watts.

One solution you might think of - why not just make panels so that they put out 14 volts or so to match the battery?

Catch #22a is that the panel is rated at 130 watts at full sunlight at a particular temperature (STC - or standard test conditions). If temperature of the solar panel is high, you don't get 17.4 volts. At the temperatures seen in many hot climate areas, you might get under 16 volts. If you started with a 15 volt panel (like some of the so-called "self regulating" panels), you are in trouble, as you won't have enough voltage to put a charge into the battery. Solar panels have to have enough leeway built in to perform under the worst of conditions. The panel will just sit there looking dumb, and your batteries will get even stupider than usual.

Nobody likes a stupid battery.

What is maximum power point tracking?

There is some confusion about the term "tracking":

Panel tracking - this is where the panels are on a mount that follows the sun. The most common are the Zomeworks and Wattsun. These optimize output by following the sun across the sky for maximum sunlight. These typically give you about a 15% increase in winter and up to a 35% increase in summer. 

This is just the opposite of the seasonal variation for MPPT controllers. Since panel temperatures are much lower in winter, they put out more power. And winter is usually when you need the most power from your solar panels due to shorter days.

Maximum Power Point Tracking is electronic tracking - usually digital. The charge controller looks at the output of the panels, and compares it to the battery voltage. It then figures out what is the best power that the panel can put out to charge the battery. It takes this and converts it to best voltage to get maximum AMPS into the battery. (Remember, it is Amps into the battery that counts). Most modern MPPT's are around 93-97% efficient in the conversion. You typically get a 20 to 45% power gain in winter and 10-15% in summer. Actual gain can vary widely depending weather, temperature, battery state of charge, and other factors.

Grid tie systems are becoming more popular as the price of solar drops and electric rates go up. There are several brands of grid-tie only (that is, no battery) inverters available. All of these have built in MPPT. Efficiency is around 94% to 97% for the MPPT conversion on those.

How Maximum Power Point Tracking works

Here is where the optimization, or maximum power point tracking comes in. Assume your battery is low, at 12 volts. A MPPT takes that 17.6 volts at 7.4 amps and converts it down, so that what the battery gets is now 10.8 amps at 12 volts. Now you still have almost 130 watts, and everyone is happy.

Ideally, for 100% power conversion you would get around 11.3 amps at 11.5 volts, but you have to feed the battery a higher voltage to force the amps in. And this is a simplified explanation - in actual fact the output of the MPPT charge controller might vary continually to adjust for getting the maximum amps into the battery.

Typical Power Curve of a Solar Electric PanelOn the left is a screen shot from the Maui Solar Software "PV-Design Pro" computer program (click on picture for full size image). If you look at the green line, you will see that it has a sharp peak at the upper right - that represents the maximum power point. What an MPPT controller does is "look" for that exact point, then does the voltage/current conversion to change it to exactly what the battery needs. In real life, that peak moves around continuously with changes in light conditions and weather.

A MPPT tracks the maximum power point, which is going to be different from the STC (Standard Test Conditions) rating under almost all situations. Under very cold conditions a 120 watt panel is actually capable of putting over 130+ watts because the power output goes up as panel temperature goes down - but if you don't have some way of tracking that power point, you are going to lose it. On the other hand under very hot conditions, the power drops - you lose power as the temperature goes up. That is why you get less gain in summer.

MPPT's are most effective under these conditions:

Winter, and/or cloudy or hazy days - when the extra power is needed the most.

  • Cold weather - solar panels work better at cold temperatures, but without a MPPT you are losing most of that. Cold weather is most likely in winter - the time when sun hours are low and you need the power to recharge batteries the most.
  • Low battery charge - the lower the state of charge in your battery, the more current a MPPT puts into them - another time when the extra power is needed the most. You can have both of these conditions at the same time.
  • Long wire runs - If you are charging a 12 volt battery, and your panels are 100 feet away, the voltage drop and power loss can be considerable unless you use very large wire. That can be very expensive. But if you have four 12 volt panels wired in series for 48 volts, the power loss is much less, and the controller will convert that high voltage to 12 volts at the battery. That also means that if you have a high voltage panel setup feeding the controller, you can use much smaller wire.

Ok, so now back to the original question - What is a MPPT?

How a Maximum Power Point Tracker Works:

The Power point tracker is a high frequency DC to DC converter. They take the DC input from the solar panels, change it to high frequency AC, and convert it back down to a different DC voltage and current to exactly match the panels to the batteries. MPPT's operate at very high audio frequencies, usually in the 20-80 kHz range. The advantage of high frequency circuits is that they can be designed with very high efficiency transformers and small components. The design of high frequency circuits can be very tricky because the problems with portions of the circuit "broadcasting" just like a radio transmitter and causing radio and TV interference. Noise isolation and suppression becomes very important.

There are a few non-digital (that is, linear) MPPT's charge controls around. These are much easier and cheaper to build and design than the digital ones. They do improve efficiency somewhat, but overall the efficiency can vary a lot - and we have seen a few lose their "tracking point" and actually get worse. That can happen occasionally if a cloud passed over the panel - the linear circuit searches for the next best point, but then gets too far out on the deep end to find it again when the sun comes out. Thankfully, not many of these around any more.

The power point tracker (and all DC to DC converters) operates by taking the DC input current, changing it to AC, running through a transformer (usually a toroid, a doughnut looking transformer), and then rectifying it back to DC, followed by the output regulator. In most DC to DC converters, this is strictly an electronic process - no real smarts are involved except for some regulation of the output voltage. Charge controllers for solar panels need a lot more smarts as light and temperature conditions vary continuously all day long, and battery voltage changes.

Smart power trackers

All recent models of digital MPPT controllers available are microprocessor controlled. They know when to adjust the output that it is being sent to the battery, and they actually shut down for a few microseconds and "look" at the solar panel and battery and make any needed adjustments. Although not really new (the Australian company AERL had some as early as 1985), it has been only recently that electronic microprocessors have become cheap enough to be cost effective in smaller systems (less than 1 KW of panel). MPPT charge controls are now manufactured by several companies, such as Outback Power, Xantrex XW-SCC, Blue Sky Energy, Apollo Solar, Midnite Solar, Morningstar and a few others.

 

The charge controller regulates this 16 to 20 volts output of the panel down to what the battery needs at the time. This voltage will vary from about 10.5 to 14.6, depending on the state of charge of the battery, the type of battery, in what mode the controller is in, and temperature. (see complete info on battery voltages in our battery section).

Using High Voltage (grid tie) Panels With Batteries

Nearly all PV panels rated over 135 watts are NOT standard 12 volt panels, and cannot (or at least should not) be used with standard charge controllers. Voltages on grid tie panels varies quite a bit, usually from 21 to 40 volts or so. Some are standard 24 volt panels, but most are not.

What happens when you use a standard controller

Standard (that is, all but the MPPT types), will often work with high voltage panels if the maximum input voltage is not exceeded. However, you will lose a lot of power - from 20 to 60% of what your panel is rated at. Charge controls take the output of the panels and feed current to the battery until the battery is fully charged, usually around 13.6 to 14.2 volts. A panel can only put out so many amps, so while the voltage is reduced from say, 33 volts to 13.6 volts, the amps from the panel cannot go higher than the rated amps - so with a 175 watt panel rated at 23 volts/7.6 amps, you will only get 7.6 amps @ 12 volts or so into the battery. Ohms Law tells us that watts is volts x amps, so your 175 watt panel will only put about 90 watts into the battery.

Using an MPPT controller with high voltage panels

The only way to get full power out of high voltage grid tie solar panels is to use an MPPT controller. See the link above for detailed into on MPPT charge controls. Since most MPPT controls can take up to 150 volts DC on the solar panel input side, you can often series two to four of the high voltage panels to reduce wire losses, or to use smaller wire. For example, with the 175 watt panel mentioned above, 2 of them in series would give you 66 volts at 7.6 amps into the MPPT controller, but the controller would convert that down to about 29 amps at 12 volts.

Charger Controller Types

Charge controls come in all shapes, sizes, features, and price ranges. They range from the small 4.5 amp (Sunguard) control, up to the 60 to 80 amp MPPT programmable controllers with computer interface. Often, if currents over 60 amps are required, two or more 40 to 80 amp units are wired in parallel. The most common controls used for all battery based systems are in the 4 to 60 amp range, but some of the new MPPT controls such as the Outback Power FlexMax go up to 80 amps.

Charge controls come in 3 general types (with some overlap):

Simple 1 or 2 stage controls which rely on relays or shunt transistors to control the voltage in one or two steps. These essentially just short or disconnect the solar panel when a certain voltage is reached. For all practical purposes these are dinosaurs, but you still see a few on old systems. Their only real claim to fame is their reliability - they have so few components, there is not much to break.

3-stage and/or PWM such Morningstar, Xantrex, Blue Sky, Steca, and many others. These are pretty much the industry standard now, but you will occasionally still see some of the older shunt/relay types around, such as in the very cheap systems offered by discounters and mass marketers.

Maximum power point tracking (MPPT), such as those made by Xantrex, Outback Power, Morningstar and others. These are the ultimate in controllers, with prices to match - but with efficiencies in the 94% to 98% range, they can save considerable money on larger systems since they provide 15 to 30% more power to the battery. For more information, see our article on MPPT.

Most controllers come with some kind of indicator, either a simple LED, a series of LED's, or digital meters. Some newer ones, such as the Outback FM60/80 and others now have built in computer interfaces for monitoring and control.  The simplest usually have only a couple of small LED lamps, which show that you have power and that you are getting some kind of charge. Most of those with meters will show both voltage and the current coming from the panels and the battery voltage. Some also show how much current is being pulled from the LOAD terminals.

All of the charge controllers that we stock are 3 or 4-stage PWM types, including the MPPT units. (in reality, "4-stage" is somewhat advertising hype - it used to be called equalize, but someone decided that 4 stage was better than 3). And now we even see one that is advertised as "5-stage"....

What is Equalization?

Equalization does somewhat what the name implies - it attempts to equalize - or make all cells in the battery or battery bank of exactly equal charge. Essentially it is a period of overcharge, usually in the 15 to 15.5 volt range. If you have some cells in the string lower than others, it will bring them all up to full capacity. In flooded batteries, it also serves the important function of stirring up the liquid in the batteries by causing gas bubbles. Of course, in an RV or boat, this does not usually do much for you unless you have been parked for months, as normal movement will accomplish the same thing. Also, in systems with small panels you may not get enough current to really do much bubbling.

What is PWM?

Quite a few charge controls have a "PWM" mode. PWM stands for Pulse Width Modulation. PWM is often used as one method of float charging. Instead of a steady output from the controller, it sends out a series of short charging pulses to the battery - a very rapid "on-off" switch. The controller constantly checks the state of the battery to determine how fast to send pulses, and how long (wide) the pulses will be. In a fully charged battery with no load, it may just "tick" every few seconds and send a short pulse to the battery. In a discharged battery, the pulses would be very long and almost continuous, or the controller may go into "full on" mode. The controller checks the state of charge on the battery between pulses and adjusts itself each time.

The downside to PWM is that it can also create interference in radios and TV's due to the sharp pulses that it generates. If you are having noise problems from your controller.

What is a Load, or "Low Voltage Disconnect" output?

Some controllers also have a "LOAD", or LVD output, which can be used for smaller loads, such as small appliances and lights. The advantage is that the load terminals have a low voltage disconnect, so it will turn off whatever is connected to the load terminals and keep from running the battery down too far. The LOAD output is often used for small non-critical loads, such as lights. A few, such as the Xantrex C12, can also be used as a lighting controller, to turn lights on at dark, but the Morningstar SLC lighting controller is usually a better choice for that. Do not use the LOAD output to run inverters. Inverters can have very high surge currents and may blow the controller.

Most systems do not need the LVD function - it can drive only smaller loads. Depending on the rating of the controller, this may be from 6 to 60 amps. You cannot run any but the smallest inverter from the LOAD output. On some controllers, such as the Morningstar SS series, the load output can be used to drive a heavy duty relay for load control, gen start etc. The LOAD or LVD output is most often used in remote systems, such as camera, monitor, and cell phone sites where the load is small and the site is unattended.

What are the "Sense" terminals on my controller?

Some charge controllers have a pair of "sense" terminals. Sense terminals carry very low current, around 1/10th of a milliamp at most, so there is no voltage drop. What it does is "look" at the battery voltage and compares it to what the controller is putting out. If there is a voltage drop between the charge controller and the battery, it will raise the controller output slightly to compensate.

These are only used when you have a long wire run between the controller and the battery. These wires carry no current, and can be pretty small - #20 to #16 AWG. We prefer to use #16 because it is not easily cut or squished accidently. They attach to the SENSE terminals on the controller, and onto the same terminals as the two charging wires at the battery end.

What is a "Battery System Monitor"?

Battery system monitors, such as the Xantrex TM500, and the TriMetric 2020 are not controllers. Instead, they monitor your battery system and give you a pretty good idea of your battery condition, and what you are using and generating. They keep track of the total amp-hours into and out of the batteries, and the battery state of charge, and other information. They can be very useful for medium to large systems for tracking exactly what your system is doing with various charging sources. They are somewhat overkill for small systems, but are kind of a fun toy if you want to see what every amp is doing :-). TriMetric's new PentaMetric model also has a computer interface and many other features.

ELECTRIC MOTORS, BATTERY AND SOLAR POWER FOR BOATS INFORMATION PAGES.

ROZ SAVAGE USED SOLAR PANELS TO POWER HER EQUIPMENT ON HER 100 DAY TRIPS ACROSS THE OCEAN TO PROMOTE GREEN AWARENESS TO THE WORLD.

CLICK ON ANY BLUE LINK FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THAT PRODUCT.


Electric and Solar canoes, Kayaks, Pontoons are the fastest growing segment of the ever increasing boating marketplace.

THE LOGOBOAT.COM SOLAR PANEL AT THE RIGHT PROVIDES POWER FOR DOCK LIGHTS,  BOAT LIFT, AND THE CHARGING OF THE ELECTRIC OUTBOARD BOAT MOTOR.
CLICK TO START MOVIE

Lean, green, economical and quiet, if you live on a lake that is small, bans internal combustion engines or is just too shallow for a gas motor, electric pontoons may be just the ticket. However, small boats and lakes are not the only use for electric power. Many people prefer electric power on their larger pontoon boats because it is more environmentally friendly and has no ongoing fuel costs. You can even add electric power to a boat that already has an internal combustion engine and have the option of either power source as the location or occasion may dictate.

Electric power has come a long way and electric motors are now offered by many different manufacturers. If you have been considering an electric powered pontoon and are not sure if it will meet your needs, click on the links below to hopefully help answer some of your questions. If you still need more information or want pricing on an electric or solar pontoon, give us a call and we would be glad to help


Is electric power viable?
Electric power is absolutely a viable power source for most boats, including pontoon boats This 24 volt solar panel provides power for the dock lights, boat lift, and the 24 volt 6 HP electric Torqeedo outboard motor.  2, deep cycle marine batteries. provide all day crusing.
If your interest is in having an environmentally friendly boat to use for quiet cruises around your lake, then electric power may be the way to go. If you would like to have an alternative power source to compliment your outboard engine, electric power or even better solar electric makes a great companion to your boats main power source. Electric propulsion has come a long way in just a few short years. Several manufacturers with years of electric power experience have designed power units that are efficient, attractive, low maintenance, and deliver performance and duration that could only be dreamed of a few short years ago. Battery technology has progressed to the point where running time and ease of charging are no longer an issue. On-board computer chargers and even solar panels are now available to keep your electric Pontoon ready when you are. Prices are reasonable and maintenance is not an issue. Electric power for Pontoons is the wave of the future and some day even water skiing and now tubing is possible with electric power. see movies here

How fast can it go? How long will the battery last?

Electric Pontoon boats can go anywhere from 2 to 10 mph and batteries can last from 1 to 42 hours depending on several different factors. On board Solar powered models can run 7 x 24 hours and never stop.

Variables like the size and weight of your pontoon boat, the size and weight of your propulsion unit and batteries, the wind and weather as well as the throttle position you maintain, all have a significant affect on the top speed and duration of your boats electric power system.

On most modern, properly configured and installed electric propulsion units, you can expect a top speed of 4 to 10 mph and a battery life of 2 to 4 hours at full speed and 4 to 8 hours at lower power settings.

Up to 42 hours run time on some Torqeedo models. NON STOP FOR SOLAR POWERED TORQEEDO MODELS.

 Battery recharge time can be from 2 to 12 hours depending on battery charge level and the type of battery charger that you use

Todayís Pontoon boat electric power and battery technology is progressing rather quickly. SOLAR CHARGING CAN DOUBLE THE BATTERY LIFE.

I am certain that it will not be long until we are attaining speeds of 20 mph + and we already have full power duration of 4 to 6 hours with electric power. Non stop running with solar power.


What types of boat electric power are available?

Several different kinds of electric power are available for your electric canoe, kayak, boat, or pontoon.

Electric trolling motors, Electric outboards, trim tab mounted electric motors, and electric motors that mount on the cavitation plate of your existing outboard motor. Letís discuss each.

Electric trolling motor- Pictured is the Torqeedo 6 HP electric. These are motors that can be mounted on the front or rear of your pontoon boat depending on its particular design. These motors are not typically used for primary propulsion except on the smallest of pontoon boats. They are the type used by fishermen on there bass boats and can either be steered by hand, foot pedal or remote control. TORQEEDO is the best we have tested. They offer the longest running time per battery charge. When equipped with a Solar charger the rum time is unlimited.

ON LARGE BOATS & PONTOONS WITH STEERING WHEELS THE REMOTE MOTOR WOKS BEST. YOU CAN ORDER A SOLAR PANEL KIT AND INSTALL IT YOURSELF OR HAVE A DEALER INSTALL IT.

KITS AVAILABLE  OR TO HAVE INSTALLED LOCALLY CALL 402-331-0854

 

 

 

 

 


 TOP MOUNTED SOLAR PANEL. ON RIGHT IS LOGOBOAT.COM DO IT YOUR SELF KIT.

12 TO 48 VOLT SOLAR POWER FOR THE POPULAR MOTORS AT  WWW.LOGOBOAT.COM

Minn Kota E-driveElectric outboards- electric outboards are the future of electric pontoon power. They look similar in design to an outboard engine but usually are much smaller and sleeker in design. They connect to your steering wheel just like an outboard and typically have a remote power control handle similar to the throttle control used on an outboard engine. Some electric outboards have power tilt just like an outboard and all

have charging systems built right into the boat. SINCE 2006 THE TORQEEDO CRUISE MODEL ELECTRIC MOTORS HAVE TAKEN OVER AS THE # 1 SELLER, WORLD WIDE

Trim tab mounted electric motors typically 2 equal power electric motors are used, one mounted on the back of each pontoon. The motors are installed on adjustable plates similar to trim tabs so they can be raised or lowered into the water.

They can be used alone or in conjunction with an outboard motor. Unlike an electric outboard that is steered in a conventional manor by your steering wheel, with these units one motor operates in forward and the other in reverse in order to turn your boat. Steering is handled by a joystick type controller similar to the way you would fly a jet fighter. Steering is intuitive in that you just move the joystick in the direction you want to go. Move the joystick left, right, forward  or back and the electric motors act as required in order to accommodate your command. One added benefit of this type of control is that the pontoon boat can literally turn in place without moving forward or back. (Handy for maneuvering in

tight quarters or at your dock) THIS TYPE OF MOTOR DOES NOT WORK WELL IN WEEDY LAKES AS IF ANY THING GETS ON 1 PROPELLER, YOU CAN NOT STEER THE BOAT.

Cavitation plate mounted electric motors. These electric motors, one or two depending on pontoon boat size, mount on the cavitation plate of your existing outboard motor. They are used to compliment your outboard motor so you have the option of using your boat on internal combustion restricted lakes or to just have a quiet, environmentally friendly power source to add to your pontoon boat experience. These motors will ride under the water level and function at trolling speeds but ride clear of the water during outboard engine operation. USUALLY FIT 40 HP & UP.


Are electric engines cost effective?

Typical cost for an electric engine on your boat will be about the same as that for a small outboard engine.
 

Cost will include the propulsion unit itself, batteries and some sort of on board charger and or solar panels. Continuing costs may include battery replacement after several years and infrequent repairs to the propulsion unit. Significant savings can be realized over an outboard engine in that there is no cost for fuel and other than battery removal winterization is not required.

Costs can be as low as $99.00 to $469.00 for a simple fishing style trolling motor. $1,200 to $1,800 for a cavitation plate mounted system to upward of $5,000 for a state of the art system with on-board charger and solar panels.

Electric outboards with batteries typically run in the $2,500 to $4,300 range


Are Solar kits available?
Yes, LOGOBOAT.COM has inexpensive kits designed to do the power requirements needs to power your  dock lights, charge your boat battery or to charge many batteries to run your electric boat. Kits can be portable to take with you for use on the motor home or the use at a remote campsite. For more information 402-331-0854
Replace costly diesel, propane or gas powered generators with clean solar power. Solar panels can charge one or more batteries, or even run substantial electrical loads. These panels are workhorse power producers for heavy marine and remote off-grid applications. Multicrystalline panels generate a higher power output in the same footprint as older designs, using a higher grade of crystalline cells. A single panel produces up to 8AMP (130W). Plug-n-Play connectors allow simplified expandability up to 24 AMPS using three 8 AMP panels connected to the right size of Charge Controller (sold separately). Expansion is unlimited with the use of additional Charge Controllers. These panels are compatible with older Solar Pro Plug-n-Play panels. Kits includes two or three panels (depending on model) and connectors.

Uses of our Solar Kits.

Designed to withstand rigorous weather conditions, these panels provide  12 VOLT TO 48 VOLT DC power for battery charging, running onboard electronics, and other electrical needs. High-efficiency polycrystalline cells convert sunlight to electricity quietly, without pollution or greenhouse gases, day after day, season after season. BATTERY LIFE IS DOUBLED WITH THE USE OF ON BOARD SOLAR CHARGING.

Using breakthrough technology perfected by years of research, these panels use a cell surface to reduce reflection of sunlight, and structured to improve conversion efficiency. An anti-reflective coating provides a uniform blue color and increases the absorption of light in all weather conditions.

Solar panels on boats, pontoons, canoes, kayaks.

ORDER A NEW CANOE, PONTOON, MINI PONTOON, OR TRIITOON EQUIPPED WITH YOUR FAVORITE MOTOR AND A SOLAR CHARGING SYSTEM, OR ORDER A KIT AND SAVE EVEN MORE AND INSTALL IT YOURSELF OR UPGRADE YOUR CURRENT BOAT, RV, MOTOR HOME, OR CAMPING EQUIPMENT MUST HAVE ITEMS FROM WWW.LOGOBOAT.COM                                                                                                       CLICK TO START MOVIE


LOGOBOAT.COM RV AND MOTOR HOME KITS
For RVs, homes, boats, back-up and remote power use, 12 volt battery charging and solar power stations, pumps, beacons, and lighting equipment. LOGOBOAT.COM complete kits include mounting hardware, wiring harness, and instructions..

OUR PORTABLE LOGOBOAT.COM KITS CAN BE MOVED FROM BOAT, TO RV, TO REMOTE CAMPSITE. THESE ITEMS ARE EXTREMELY LOW IN PRICE AND EVEN MORE AFFORDABLE WHEN USED YEAR ROUND FOR MULTIPLE USES.

Solar Battery Maintainer

OUR PRICES ON THESE ITEMS ARE EXTREMELY LOW AND AFFORDABLE!
402-331-0854

Solar Battery charger at the campground.

Solar bringing you an easy to use reliable source of power for your small appliances, remote areas, camping, tailgating, hunting and fishing.

Itís always a day in the sun when your outdoor experience includes a solar-powered charger. Draw energy from the sun to charge anything-- from your car battery, to the lighting system in your cabin or tent. Control your own clean and eco-friendly power source that delivers energy, whether itís cloudy or sunny. So go ahead relax, experience Nature in all its glory when you camp out with any of these easy-to-use products.


THIS IS OUR PULMOR TRAILER EQUIPPED WITH A SOLAR PANEL. IT WILL CHARGE WHEN PARKED, AS PICTURED OR AS YOU TRAVEL DOWN THE ROAD WITH THE SOLAR PANEL IN THE FLAT POSITION. READY TO GO FROM OUR FACTORY OR BUY A AFTERMARKET KIT AND DO IT YOURSELF. AVAILABLE IN 12, 24, 36, 48 VOLT DC. AND 110 AND 220 VOLT MODELS.  CALL US AT THE FACTORY WITH YOUR QUESTION 402-331-0854 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILED INFORMATION. CLICK HERE   CLICK TO SEE MOVIE
NEED A SMALL LIGHTWEIGHT ENCLOSED TRAILER TO CARRY ALL YOUR GEAR? WE HAVE THEM  AT A AFFORDABLE PRICES TO HANDLE ALL YOUR NEEDS. MODELS ARE SALE PRICED FROM $2249.00 GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR ENCLOSED TRAILERS CLICK HERE OR CALL THE FACTORY 402-331-0854

Solar Battery accessory cords for multiple uses.
Allows you to power or charge a variety of electrical items.

FOLDING 24 WATT CHARGER IS ONLY 1 INCH THICK. GREAT FOR THE BOAT, CAMPGROUND OR ANYWHERE  YOU NEED 12 VOLT POWER. COMES WITH CIGARETTE PLUG JUST LIKE YOU HAVE IN YOUR CAR. PLUG YOUR CELL PHONE OR MP3 AND ALWAYS HAVE POWER. ONLY $399.95 FROM WWW.LOGOBOAT.COM
 
402-331-0854


ALL ABOUT POWER INVERTERS FOR EMERGENCY USE, FULL TIME POWER IN REMOTE AREAS, POWER FOR YOUR CAMPING TRIP, ETC.

THIS MOVIE IS PACKED WITH INFORMATION. USE WITH SOLAR PANELS OR STAND ALONE WITH BATTERY.

CLICK HERE TO START MOVIE


402-331-0854

P3 KILL A WATT FOR USE IN CALCULATING POWER CONSUMPTION.

THE ITEM ON THE LEFT IS A TOOL FOR MEASURING THE POWER THAT EACH OF YOUR APPLIANCE DRAW.

THIS IS MANY TIMES MORE ACCURATE THAN USING THE RATINGS ON THE APPLIANCE THEMSELVES

THIS ALSO ALLOWS YOU TO SPOT TROUBLE ITEMS DRAWING MORE POWER THAN THEY SHOULD.

ORDER TODAY! ONLY $49.95 PREPAID FREIGHT DELIVERED TO YOU IN 2 TO 3 DAYS.
CALL 402-331-0854
IF YOU READ THIS FAR AND WANT MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

  QUESTIONS  CALL 402-331-0854






 POWER CHAIR TRAILERS, HANDICAPPED PONTOONS  SAM'S CLUB WALMART  CLICK HERE




 
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 MOVIES PONTOONS 6 X 11 6 X12 FT PONTOONS 6X14 PONTOON 6X16 FT PONTOON 8 FT. WIDE  SWIM RAFTS  

 BASS BABY 8 FT  MOTORS  SOLAR  TRAILERS   HANDICAPPED  CONTACT     DEALER  LOCATIONS  PRICES

HAVE A QUESTION CALL US AT 402-331-0854    DEALERSHIPS OPEN IN SELECT AREAS CALL 402-331-0854